Cloud Foldings Thoughts of a cloud, unfolding...

Words and photos are mine unless reblogged or otherwise stated. I can be contacted at shespeaksclouds at gmail dot com ^_^
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  1. Eron called me over to see the ‘sparkly water’ in the canal. I guess that’s how long it’s been since we were by the sea. Once, watching the gold on the water was just part of my day…
  2. Eron called me over to see the ‘sparkly water’ in the canal. I guess that’s how long it’s been since we were by the sea. Once, watching the gold on the water was just part of my day…

    2 months ago Short URL 5 notes
  3. Graffiti in the university district…
  4. Graffiti in the university district…

    2 months ago Short URL 7 notes
  5. The Willamette river was found today and picnicked by. The sky was clear blue, the air cool but kind. No map, no complaints from children about the distance we traversed by foot. Just a sense of direction and suddenly the sound of water calling us close. Life’s quiet beauty on a sunny winter’s day.
  6. The Willamette river was found today and picnicked by. The sky was clear blue, the air cool but kind. No map, no complaints from children about the distance we traversed by foot. Just a sense of direction and suddenly the sound of water calling us close. Life’s quiet beauty on a sunny winter’s day.

    2 months ago Short URL 5 notes
  7. "Making art is like having a conversation.
    I like to speak simply. I like to speak the truth."
    2 months ago Short URL 178 notes
  8. windypoplarsroom:

Kawabata Ryushi
"A Hundred Children" 
  9. windypoplarsroom:

    Kawabata Ryushi

    "A Hundred Children" 

    2 months ago Short URL 117 notes
  10. magnoliajones:

via XuXudidi et plus encore

Things I need to do this year…knit socks! :D
  11. magnoliajones:

    via XuXudidi et plus encore

    Things I need to do this year…knit socks! :D

    (via grrlandog)

    2 months ago Short URL 67 notes
  12. memuka:

    Paper cranes folded by Japanese children in memorial of Sadako Sasaki at the peace monument in Hiroshima

    Sadako Sasaki was two years old when the atomic bomb was dropped on August 6, 1945, near her home by Misasa Bridge in Hiroshima, Japan. She was at home when the explosion occurred, about one mile from Ground Zero. In November 1954, Sadako developed swellings on her neck and behind her ears. In January 1955, purple spots had formed on her legs. Subsequently, she was diagnosed with leukemia (her mother referred to it as “an atom bomb disease”). She was hospitalized on February 21, 1955, and given, at the most, a year to live.

    After being diagnosed with leukemia from the radiation, Sadako spent her time in a nursing home folding origami paper cranes in hope of making a thousand of them. She was inspired to do so by the Japanese legend that one who created a thousand origami cranes would be cured by the gods. Her wish was simply to live. However, she managed to fold only 644 cranes before she became too weak to fold any more, and died on 25 October 1955 in the morning. Her friends and family helped finish her dream by folding the rest of the cranes, which were buried with Sadako.

    After her death, Sadako’s friends and schoolmates published a collection of letters in order to raise funds to build a memorial to her and all of the children who had died from the effects of the atomic bomb. In 1958, a statue of Sadako holding a golden crane was unveiled in the Hiroshima Peace Park.

    At the foot of the statue is a plaque that reads: “This is our cry. This is our prayer. Peace on Earth.” Every year on Obon Day, which is a holiday in Japan to remember the departed spirits of one’s ancestors, thousands of people leave paper cranes near the statue.

    3 months ago Short URL 13 notes
  13. The best 2013 films that made under $100,000

    Managed not to hear about any of these…

    (Source: thefilmfatale, via fzkafka)

    3 months ago Short URL 27 notes
  14. "

    Success is somebody else’s failure. Success is the American Dream we can keep dreaming because most people in most places, including thirty million of ourselves, live wide awake in the terrible reality of poverty. No, I do not wish you success. I don’t even want to talk about it. I want to talk about failure.

    Because you are human beings you are going to meet failure. You are going to meet disappointment, injustice, betrayal, and irreparable loss. You will find you’re weak where you thought yourself strong. You’ll work for possessions and then find they possess you. You will find yourself — as I know you already have — in dark places, alone, and afraid.

    What I hope for you, for all my sisters and daughters, brothers and sons, is that you will be able to live there, in the dark place. To live in the place that our rationalizing culture of success denies, calling it a place of exile, uninhabitable, foreign.

    "
    Ursula K. Le Guin, “A Left-Handed Commencement Address” at Mills College, for the class of 1989. (via vulturechow)

    (Source: magicalrealness, via vulturechow)

    3 months ago Short URL 382 notes
  15. First amercian rainbow ^_^

    3 months ago Short URL 16 notes
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